Holidays to Bako National Park, Borneo

Bako National Park is Borneo’s oldest national park. It’s also the smallest, but what it doesn’t have in size it makes up for in substance. It’s known for its biodiversity, including rainforest, mangrove swamps, beaches, cliffs, streams and waterfalls. Unlike some of its larger counterparts, Bako National Park is easy to get to. It’s just 37 kilometres from Kuching. Ideally, you need a few days to explore it properly, but it’s a do-able day trip from the city if you’re tight on time.

Bako National Park is criss-crossed by sixteen well-maintained and colour-coded jungle trails. Some are quick and easy routes that are suited to most fitness abilities and not too challenging. Other trails are full day jungle hikes for the chance to appreciate the full diversity of Bako and the opportunity to see as much wildlife as possible, including long-tailed macaques and those marvellous bearded pigs. A headliner of Bako National Park is the proboscis monkey. In fact, Borneo is the only place in the world where these rare, elusive monkeys live wildly. Bako’s reputed to be one of the best places in Borneo to observe these primates up close.

The white-sand stretches of Bako’s shoreline beckon beach bunnies looking for some downtime between hikes. One of the best beaches is Telok Pandan Kecil, flanked by limestone and sandstone cliffs with a view to the iconic Sea Stack. If you’re at Bako as dusk draws in, head to Telok Assam beach for the sight of hundreds of swifts by their nests on the rocks. Not to mention a colourful and photogenic sunset.

 

Eline
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I have lived in Vietnam and travelled extensively in Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar and the Philippines.

Bako National Park

When to go to Bako National Park

Bako National Park has a tropical rainforest climate, with high levels of humidity year round. The Park can be difficult to access during the heaviest part of the rainy season between November-February.